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   -Genealogy

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1 Christine Rose Nicknames: Past and Present





 
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2 John Philip Colletta They Came in Ships: Finding Your Immigrant Ancestor's Arrival Record (3rd Edition)
Ancestry 2002 091648937X / 9780916489373 paperback 140 pages, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2, paperback, Ancestry 



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Price: 12.95 USD
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The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy, 3rd edition, Loretto Szucs & Sandra Luebking
3 Loretto Szucs & Sandra Luebking The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy, 3rd edition
2006 965 pages, 
The "Best Reference Book" for genealogists. Includes a comprehensive guide to genealogy resources.


 
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4 Paul Drake More What Did They Mean By That?
Heritage Books 2006 078843571X / 9780788435713 hardback 193 pages, hardback, Heritage Books 
The second of this popular dictonary of historical and genealogical terms old and new.

The family historian must seek out the records of the merchants, courts, legislators, and churches, as well as the everyday expressions of the common men and women, all the while striving to remain aware that just as we have created words like television, computer, microwave oven, automobile, space station, gigabyte, and airplane, and set aside words as ticking and icebox, stadle, and squabpie, our ancestors had to do the same. They made up the likes of telegraph, railroad, and telescope, and assimilated German words like hex, sauerkraut, fresh, hoodlum, and kindergarten; Spanish words such as barbeque, chocolate, and tornado; French sounds like bayou, levee, depot, and chowder; and Indian words such as hickory, pecan, hominy, moccasin, and raccoon. Though they invented the likes of popcorn, sweet potato, eggplant, bullfrog, and backwoodsman, they left behind them terms no longer needed in their daily lives. Gone were the likes of moxa (Indian moss burned on an area of the body, thought to cure gout), hautboy (oboe), gruntling (young hog), muchwhat (nearly), revelrout (a ruckus), and, from most regions of the U.S., the long ďaĒ sounds of old England (fahst for fast, dahnce for dance, and hoff, meaning half.) The words found here are seen at every turn of research; in court documents (especially inventories of estates, court entries, and lawsuits), church records, books, newspapers, letters, and songs. Mr. Drake, retired lawyer and teacher, and veteran genealogist, writes with a pleasing style that is entertaining and educational. He is the author of the popular guide, Genealogy: How to Find Your Ancestors, and You Ought to Write All That Down.


 
Price: 21.50 USD
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5 Paul Drake What Did They Mean By That?
2003 335 pages, 
A Dictionary of Historical & Genealogical Terms, Old & New. Over 4500 words explained including occupations, descriptions of early furniture and foods, common medical terms, court terms, and many forgotten expressions.


 
Price: 36.00 USD
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6 Paul Drake What Did They Mean By That?
Heritage Books 0788425005 / 9780788425004 (2000), 2003, 5.5 x 8.5, cloth, 334 pages, Heritage Books 
A Dictionary of Historical & Genealogical Terms, Old & New. Over 4500 words explained including occupations, descriptions of early furniture and foods, common medical terms, court terms, and many forgotten expressions.

The family historian must seek out the records of the merchants, courts, legislators, and churches, as well as the everyday expressions of the common men and women, all the while striving to remain aware that just as we have created words like television, computer, microwave oven, automobile, space station, gigabyte, and airplane, and set aside words as ticking and icebox, stadle, and squabpie, our ancestors had to do the same. They made up the likes of telegraph, railroad, and telescope, and assimilated German words like hex, sauerkraut, fresh, hoodlum, and kindergarten; Spanish words such as barbeque, chocolate, and tornado; French sounds like bayou, levee, depot, and chowder; and Indian words such as hickory, pecan, hominy, moccasin, and raccoon. Though they invented the likes of popcorn, sweet potato, eggplant, bullfrog, and backwoodsman, they left behind them terms no longer needed in their daily lives. Gone were the likes of moxa (Indian moss burned on an area of the body, thought to cure gout), hautboy (oboe), gruntling (young hog), muchwhat (nearly), revelrout (a ruckus), and, from most regions of the U.S., the long "a" sounds of old England (fahst for fast, dahnce for dance, and hoff, meaning half.) In addition to terminology, such as the names of the many courts and legal processes, this collection of more than 4500 words includes many occupations, descriptions of early furniture and foods, common medical terms and herbal remedies, and many all but forgotten expressions. The words found here are seen at every turn of research; in court documents (especially inventories of estates, court entries, and lawsuits), church records, books, newspapers, letters, and songs. Mr. Drake, retired lawyer and teacher, and veteran genealogist, writes with a pleasing style that is entertaining and educational. He is the author of the popular guide, Genealogy: How to Find Your Ancestors, and You Ought to Write All That Down.


 
Price: 36.00 USD
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Mastering Genealogical Proof, Thomas W. Jones
7 Thomas W. Jones Mastering Genealogical Proof
2013 Perfect-bound 8.5x11 
As a unique textbook on genealogical methods and reasoning in the twentyfirst century, Mastering Genealogical Proof guides readers in acquiring genealogical skills transcending chronological, ethnic, geopolitical, and religious boundaries. Mastering Genealogical Proof aims to help researchers, students, and new family historians reconstruct relationships and lives of people they cannot see. It presents content in digestible chunks. Each chapter concludes with problems providing practice for proficiently applying the chapterís concepts. Those problems, like examples throughout the book, use real records, real research, and real issues. Answers are at the back of the book along with a glossary of technical terms and an extensive resource list. Thomas W. Jones, who has pursued his family history since he was fifteen, is an award-winning genealogical researcher, writer, editor, and educator. 
Price: 24.95 USD
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